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Guideline Publications no 116 Hawker Fury and Nimrod
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no 116 Hawker Fury and Nimrod

Author: William Harrison
The first RAF front line fighter to achieve more than 200 mph was the Hawker Fury, and its naval counterpart the Hawker Nimrod. These two attractive fighters came from the design office of the late Sydney Camm, Hawker's chief designer. The Fury started life as a private venture known as the Hornet but when this machine exceeded expectations the name was changed to Fury. Although only ordered in small numbers owing to financial constraints during the Great Depression production eventually exceeded 260 machines with orders from the RAF, Royal Navy, Persia (now Iran), Portugal, Spain, Yugoslavia and more than 30 supplied (ex-RAF) to the South African Air Force. The Fury entered service with No.43 Squadron who accepted 16 during May 1930 and stayed in front line service until January 1939 when it was replaced by the Gloster Gladiator, although quite a few remained in the training role until mid-1941. The Furies were used in combat during WWII by Yugoslavia where they were quickly despatched by the more modern fighters of the Luftwaffe. South Africa used Furies in the East African war until 1941 and the three supplied to Spain were in action, one of them serving on both sides! The Nimrod, while bearing a distinct resemblance to the Fury, flew early in 1930. Changes for the RN included longer exhaust pipes extending down both sides of the fuselage as far as the pilot's cockpit; an oil cooler fitted beneath the engine bay and at a later date arrester gear was fitted for carrier use. Later series Nimrods featured a larger tail surface to improve inverted spinning characteristics when fitted with floats. Deliveries of Nimrods started in September 1933 and they remained in use until May 1939. Only a small number of Nimrods found their way abroad, two went to Denmark to act as pattern aircraft for licensed production, one was shipped to Japan and one to Portugal. Although one Fury managed to survive in the scrapyard of a London dealer it fell to John Isaacs, a draughtsman from Vickers Armstrong, to design and build both a 1/7th scale Fury and Spitfire, both of which continue to be built by members of the Light Aircraft Association, née the Popular Flying Association. This book is written by William Harrison and is superbly illustrated by Richard J.Caruana.
Stock code: WPT116

 £16.00
 

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Guideline Publications no 115 Albermarle Armstorng Whitworth
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no 115 Albermarle
Armstorng Whitworth
Vy Tony Buttler
The Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle is something of an 'odd man out' in the list of British World War Two military aircraft. It was manufactured entirely in a special factory as sub-contract work, to save light alloys it was intended to make use of steel tube and wood in its construction, and its service career was undistinguished. As a result the Albemarle is a rather forgotten aircraft and yet it made an important contribution during the latter part of the conflict. This new Warpaint will hopefully make enthusiasts more aware of the background and career of this unusual aeroplane. This book is written by Tony Buttler and is superbly illustrated by Mark Rolfe.
Stock code: WPT115

 £13.00
 

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Guideline Publications no 114 F-4 Phantom 11 US navy- US marine corps and RAF F-4J (UK)
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no 114 F-4 Phantom 11
US navy- US marine corps and RAF F-4J (UK)
by Charles Stafrace
There was a little ghost like about the McDonnell F-4 Phantom 11. It's huge bulk, a hunched shape that exuded a wrestler's strength, the upward slant of it's wingtips contrasting sharply with the acute droop of its tailplane, all gave it a menacing appearance which some would call outright ugliness but most would call rare beauty.
This latest Warpaint Book written by Charles Starfrace describes in detail the development of each Phantom 11 version flown by the US Navy and US Marines, as well as their operational service, especially their contribution to the US effort during the Vietnam War. The book contains no fewer than 242 photos, the vast majority of them in colour, and is superbly illustrated with twelve pages of colour artwork as well as detailed plans of the US Navy and Marines versions.
This excellent book has 124 pages and is perfect bound
Stock code: WPT114

 £24.00
 

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Guideline Publications no 113 Panavia Tornado ADV No.113  in the Warpaint series
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no 113 Panavia Tornado ADV
No.113 in the Warpaint series
by Des Brennan
We now have the Revel 1:48 kit in stock !!!!!! check our KITS tab

The Tornado F.3 spent just over twenty-three years in frontline operational service with the Royal Air Force compared to a similar period for air-defence Phantoms, and twenty-eight years for the Lightning. While every operational Tornado F.3 unit bar 25 Squadron had been operating one of those aircraft types before transitioning to the F.3 only 29 (as OCU) and 11 Squadrons along with 1435 Flight would move forward from Tornado onto the Eurofighter Typhoon. And of them only the latter transitioned directly without a break in service. Its entry-to-service was not, just like many other types before and since, particularly smooth especially with regard to its Foxhunter radar, however once the initial problems were resolved it went on to possess and deliver an outstanding BVR CAP capability. It was not and was never intended to be one of the 'dogfighters' it was often erroneously compared with, and through the design compromise with the IDS variants was undeniably more suited to a low/mid-level environment. Despite this and with the ever growing constraints on RAF budgets and concomitant growing demands on the Tornado F.3 throughout its service, the skills and dedication of its air and ground crews along with the expertise of the British aviation industry ensured that the aircraft more than excelled in all that was asked of it. Perhaps most tellingly the Tornado F.3/ADV was taken into combat by all three operators, with the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia over Iraq and by the United Kingdom and Italy over the Balkans. In both theatres the opposing regimes had proven records of manipulating propaganda and were forever alert to exploit any imagined weakness as some armchair Air Marshals would have had the F.3/ADV to be. Yet while all three operators faced threats from ground defences, on not one occasion did any hostile force attempt get close enough to expose itself to the real and present threat posed by the Tornado F.3 ADV. This book is written by Des Brennan and is superbly illustrated by Richard J.Caruana.
Stock code: WPT110

 £16.00
 

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Guideline Publications No.112 Douglas A3D skywarrior No.112  in the Warpaint series
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No.112 Douglas A3D skywarrior
No.112 in the Warpaint series
by Charles Stafrace
Never glamorous and not receiving the recognition showered on its deck mates, the shipboard Douglas A3D Skywarrior will be remembered by US Navy fans and historians for many reasons, most of all because it figured prominently in the Cold War crises of the late 1950s and early 1960s, culminating in the Vietnam War that dragged on until the mid-1970s. The Skywarrior will also be remembered for its longevity, the first examples having shared deck space with FJ Furies aboard Second World War-vintage carriers in the 1950s, and the last examples mingling with F-14 Tomcats on nuclear-powered Nimitz Class carriers in 1987. However, this magnificent aircraft, affectionately known as the 'Whale', achieved fame in roles different from that for which it had been designed. After its strategic nuclear bomber role faded owing to changed US Navy and Pentagon policies, the Skywarrior excelled in other roles entrusted to it such as aerial tanking and electronic jamming, electronic and photoreconnaissance, vital tasks which it carried out faithfully in the first line of battle for several years from 1965 onwards. Indeed, the RA-3B version was also used during the 1991 Operation Desert Storm. Some examples were converted into bombardier trainers and VIP staff transports, while others found their way
to experimental establishments and aerospace companies as testbeds for various systems and weaponry until
2011, resulting in many strange nose shapes and radomes. The Skywarrior will be recorded, too, as being the heaviest jet aircraft to ever operate from any US Navy aircraft carrier. It served with several types of squadrons - VAH, VAQ, VAK, VAP/VCP, VQ and VR. All versions and squadrons, both shipboard and land-based, are listed in this new Warpaint series by Guideline Publications, written by Charles Stafrace and illustrated by Richard J Caruana. Apart from the usual detailed text that describes each version and its operational service, several other tables are included in this profile, including production serials, versions lists, squadron use and Appendices giving detailed data on each Skywarrior cruise, specifications, and the 1962 type re-designation of US Navy aircraft. No fewer than 200 B&W and colour photos, many of which are being published for the first time, illustrate the various versions of this versatile aircraft.
Stock code: WPT110

 £19.00
 

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Guideline Publications No.111 OS2U Kingfisher No.111  in the Warpaint series
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No.111 OS2U Kingfisher
No.111 in the Warpaint series
by Adrian M Balch
As the mighty battlewagon ploughed through the waters of the Pacific few would have noticed the little aircraft perched on the ships stern. To many it was 'old, slow and ugly' while to others it was veritable life saver. The name of this unsung hero: the Vought OS2U Kingfisher. Designed initially for gunnery spotting duties the Kingfisher was lightly armed defensively although once America entered the war it soon found itself toting depth charges. Manned by a crew of two that consisted of a pilot and the guy in back who did everything else the little spotter aircraft soon earned itself a solid reputation. It was the rescue mission at Truk that made the aircraft famous. After a heavy raid upon Truk the crew spotted their
own airmen struggling in the water. Setting down the little Kingfisher soon found itself festooned in rescued aircrew. The little engine managed to drag the overweight machine to a meeting with a submarine where all were rescued, the slowly sinking aircraft being sunk. The rescue efforts of the Pacific Kingfishers plus those of the Martin Mariner (also in this series) formed the basis of the air sea rescue concept in use today. Outside of the US Navy the OS2U was flown by the USCG,USMC, the Fleet Air Arm, various Latin
American countries, the RAAF who took it to the Antarctic plus the Russian Navy. Fortunately a handful survive in preservation in Australia and the United States.
Stock code: WPT110

 £14.50
 

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Guideline Publications No.110 Westland Scout & Wasp No.110  in the Warpaint series
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No.110 Westland Scout & Wasp
No.110 in the Warpaint series
by Adrian M Balch
the 1957 Defence Review and subsequent British aircraft industry overhaul resulted in all the smaller helicopter companies - Bristol, Fairey and Saunder-Roe being absorbed by Westland. These acquisitions brought existing models with them but in practice it was only the Saunders-Rie P531 which serviced to become a successful production model. Developed as the Scout for the Army and Wasp for the Royal Navy
Stock code: WPT110

 £15.00
 

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Guideline Publications No.109 Douglas C-54/R5D No.109  in the Warpaint series
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No.109 Douglas C-54/R5D
No.109 in the Warpaint series
by Charles Stafrace
The Douglas C-54 Skymaster, a direct adaptation of the civilian DC-4 while still on the production line, became the outstanding long-range four-engined transport aircraft of the Second World War. With its origins as a civilian airliner, it served chiefly on the long-distance haul of Air Transport Command of the United States Army Air Forces on the Atlantic and Pacific routes, where it cut flight hours between the United States and the theatres of operation thousands of miles away.
The reliability of its airframe and engines was put to good use also on the India-China 'Hump' route, which was described as the most arduous of all within the responsibility of Air Transport Command. Like its smaller Douglas stable mate the C-47, the C-54 boasted legendary reliability, and was the preferred long-range transport from among its contemporaries.
A special VIP version was built for use by the President of the United States, Franklin D Roosevelt.
The Royal Air Force also used it in small numbers during the Second World War, one of which was outfitted as a VIP aircraft for use by Prime Minister Winston Churchill. The US Navy acquired it under the designation R5D.

All production having been commandeered by the USAAF on the outbreak of war, no civilian DC-4s flew during the war. After 1945, however, hundreds became available for use by civilian airlines, which converted them into airliners with passenger seating and comfort, or used them as freighters. Douglas re-opened its production line for new builds in 1946, but the cheap price of the second-hand market kept back this production to only 79 examples.
Also in 1946 Canadair ventured to build a Rolls-Royce Merlin-powered version, which it named North Star, used by both military and commercial operators. The DC-4 was a common sight in the immediate post-war period up to the 1950s flown by leading European and United States airline liveries, until it started to be replaced by Douglas's own DC-6 and DC-7.
The aircraft came in handy during the 1948-49 Berlin Airlift, during which it hauled food supplies and even coal to the beleaguered German city, and again during the Korean War, airlifting the wounded to Japan and the United States.
Dozens of variants of the C-54 were employed in a wide variety of non-combat roles such as air-sea rescue, scientific and military research and missile tracking and recovery. No fewer than 1,315 examples of Skymasters were built in the United States and Canada, flown by 35 air arms of other countries in a variety of versions and roles, and full information on serials, versions and other remarks are all included in very detailed tables in this book.

The Aviation Traders Carvair cross-Channel car ferry is not forgotten in this account, and a chapter is dedicated to this unique aircraft converted in Britain from standard C-54s.
This new 96 page Warpaint publication written by Charles Stafrace contains 200 colour and B&W photos plus eleven pages of colour artwork by Richard Caruana.
Stock code: WPT109

 £19.50
 

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Guideline Publications No.108 Martin Mariner & Marlin No.108  in the Warpaint series
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No.108 Martin Mariner & Marlin
No.108 in the Warpaint series
by Kev Darling
The Glenn L Martin company would produce the most successful range of seaplanes
to enter US service. The first off the blocks was the PBM Mariner that would see
extensive service with the US Navy in various roles including general patrol duties,
anti-submarine work, rescue duties and strangely enough for a purported patrol aircraft,
as a bomber. So impressed was the USN with the Mariner that they pressed Martin to
develop an improved version. The result was the Marlin that entered service in the post-war
period and supplemented its older sibling during the Korean War. The P5M Marlin's last active
service was during the Vietnam War although it was soon replaced by land based patrol
aircraft. Both types were used by non-American operators both in Latin America and Europe.
Even the Royal Air Force operated the Mariner although its sojurn in RAF colours was brief,
to say the least! This book is written by Kev Darling and is superbly illustrated by
Richard J.Caruana.
Stock code: WPT108

 £15.50
 

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Guideline Publications No.107 Ilyushin IL-2 'Sturmovik' No.107  in the Warpaint series
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No.107 Ilyushin IL-2 'Sturmovik'
No.107 in the Warpaint series
by Oleg Rastrenin
Stock code: WPT107

 £14.00
 

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