* Complete and detailed history
* Scale Plans
* In detail pictures
* Pages of superb colour camouflage drawings, colour, and black and white photography
* Complete production list
* Squadrons, units and individual aircraft serials and codes
* Comprehensive specification


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Guideline Publications Warpaint 131 - The AUSTER In British Military & foreign air arm service
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Warpaint 131 - The AUSTER
  £17.00
In British Military & foreign air arm service
By Adrian M. Balch

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  Author Adrian M Balch
  64 pages  £17.00
15 pages of Colour Profiles
Over 150 many never seen before images

The Auster In British Military & foreign air arm service

Stemming from the original American Taylorcraft design, the British Auster is arguably as well known and famous as the Tiger Moth, being built at the right time to provide a vital role during WW2 in the Air Observation Post role, spotting and reporting artillery positions, particularly during D-Day and through decades of post-war conflicts worldwide. Founded in 1938 at the Britannia Works, Thurmaston near Leicester, England, as Taylorcraft Aero-planes (England) Limited, they made 1,604 high-wing Taylorcraft Auster monoplanes which were built during World War II for the armed forces of the UK and Canada. The type has proved to be versatile and adaptable to worldwide conditions being fitted with wheels, floats or skis as per the Trans-Antarctic Expeditions, which are all recorded within. This is another comprehensive Warpaint book by Adrian Balch, which covers the design and de-velopment of the Auster, highlighting the variants that were used in military service by the RAF, Army Air Corps and air arms around the world, culminating in the variants built by BEAGLE. Nearly 150 photographs, many rare and never seen before, illustrate the type in military service, supported by 13 pages of colour profile drawings and plans by artist Sam Pearson.
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Guideline Publications Warpaint 130 - IIyushin II-28
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Warpaint 130 - IIyushin II-28
  £17.00

By Nikolay Yakubovich

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  Author Nikolay Jakubovich
  68 pages  £17.00
PLUS 8 pages of A2 page plans
8 pages of Colour Profiles
Never seen before Images
Nikolay Yakubovich documents fully this milestone in Soviet aviation history.
On sale Friday 15th September 2021

The Ilyushin Il-28 (NATO reporting name 'Beagle') was the Soviet Union's first jet bomber to enter large-scale production. Licence-built in China as the Harbin H-5, as well as in the Czech Republic, total production in the USSR alone was 6,316 aircraft. The aircraft drew on captured wartime technology, as well as benefitting from the sale to the USSR of Rolls-Royce Nene jet en-gines, reproduced for soviet use as the RD-45. The Il-28 was widely export-ed, serving in the air arms of some 20 nations ranging from the Warsaw Pact to various Middle-Eastern and African air forces. The aircraft also saw limited use in Vietnam and with the Afghan forces in Afghanistan, while Finland had four examples delivered between 1961 and 1966 for target-towing duties, which remained in service until the 1980s.

This latest Warpaint includes all the usual expertise and research that has made the series the benchmark for aviation reference material. With full history, development, walkaround, and colour artwork and plans, author Nikolay Yakubovich documents fully this milestone in Soviet aviation history.
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Guideline Publications Special no 5 NAA P-51 Mustang Warpaint Special No 5
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Special no 5 NAA P-51 Mustang
  £22.00
Warpaint Special No 5
Author Kev Darling

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  Author superb and respected Kev Darling
  Artwork by John Fox
  A massive 108 pages  £22.00
Over 200 images some never seen before
16 pages of Colour Profiles
  2 page scale Plans
4 pages of detailed Aircraft used by various units

North American Aviation's P-51 Mustang is right up there in the top echelon of fighter of the second world war. However, without the Britain's desperate need for fighter aircraft this iconic machine might never have existed. Although the first prototype was damaged after a ground loop during initial test flights it was quickly repaired.
This airframe would be followed a further small batch of aircraft to extend the flight envelope and clear the installed weaponry. As the Mustang was garnering attention to itself courtesy of an outstanding performance and manoeuvrability it came as no surprise when the USAAC purloined an example for their own use. Deliveries to Britain would begin fairly quickly, the new fighter slotting into the fighter recon role, its only limitation being deprecated performance at high level due to the version of engine installed in the airframe.
Even so Mustang production ramped up with deliveries taking place to the RAF and the USAAF. There was one diversion along the way that produced the excellent A-36A Dive bomber.

The best known model of the Mustang was the Merlin powered P-51D/K series that gained fame in all the theatres it served in, becoming the long range escort fighter of choice for bombing raids over Germany and Japan. Postwar the Mustang lingered on in USAF service having one last successful fling over Korea before retirement.
This was not the end of the road for the Merlin powered P-51's as numerous airforces around the world would use them throughout the 1950's before they were finally traded in for jets. Nowadays the Mustang has become a favourite amongst the warbird community and in better times could be seen at various air shows around the world.

This book is written by Kev Darling and is supported with artwork by John Fox.
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1awarpaint special no5 p-51 insidecovercontents


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Guideline Publications 129 - Mikoyan-Gurevich  MiG-3
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129 - Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-3
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Author Nikolay Yakubovich

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Warpaint No.129 Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-3 Author Nikolay Yakubovich
72 pages. £17.00
9 pages of Colour Profiles
6 pages of Scale Plans
Over 120 images some never published before!!!

By the time Operation Barbarossa unfolded on 22 June 1941 some 981 MiG-3s were in service with the Soviet Air Forces (VVS), the Soviet Air Defence Forces (PVO) and Soviet Naval Aviation, but the aircraft had undergone a difficult development and was an unforgiving machine to fly in combat.
It had been designed for high-altitude but combat over the Eastern Front was generally at lower altitudes, where it was outmatched by its chief adversary, the Bf 109.
Combat losses were high, and over time, the aircraft were concen-trated in the PVO, where its disadvantages mattered less, despite which the type had been replaced in service by the end of the conflict.
This latest book in the Warpaint series covers the aircraft comprehensively, with an impressive historical text, and a selection of photographs that will be essential for any modeller considering a project. Drawing on original Soviet sources and archives this is an authoritative and comprehensive account of one of the great fighter aircraft of World War 2.

Once again author Nikolay Yakubovich has provided an authoritative text backed up by historical images and colour artwork and scale drawings to the same standard by artist Andrey Yurgen-son.
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Guideline Publications 128 Bristol Scout
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128 Bristol Scout
  £14.00

Author Matthew Willis

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One of the great unsung keystones in the development of aerial combat, the Bristol Scout was originally designed as a racing aircraft. It was used by the RNAS and the RFC as a 'scout', or fast reconnaissance machine, and was one of the first single-seaters to be used as a fighter aircraft.
Designed in the second half of 1913 the first flight was made at Larkhill on 23 February the following year after which it was exhibited at the March 1914 Aero Show at Olympia in London. It was evaluated by the British military in May 1914 at Farnborough and its period of service saw great leaps forward in the design and tactical usage of fighter aircraft, and many of the earliest attempts to perfect forward-firing guns were tested in action using Bristol Scouts.
An RNAS Scout was the first landplane to be flown from a ship, when Flt.Cdr. B.F Fowler flew No. 1255 from the flying deck of the seaplane carrier HMS Vindex on 3 November 1915. The aircraft saw service in both Europe and the Middle East but by mid-1916 was largely relegated to training units.
This latest book in the Warpaint series covers the aircraft comprehensively, with an impressive historical text, and a selection of photographs that will be essential for any modeller considering a project.

Author Matthew Willis is well-known for his authoritative books on classic British aircraft, and we are particularly pleased to add this follow-up to his earlier volume on the Sopwith Pup to the series. Artwork is by John Fox
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Guideline Publications Cesna T-37 & A-37 Dragonfly ON SALE NOW
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Cesna T-37 & A-37 Dragonfly
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ON SALE NOW
Author Kev Darling

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When USAF went searching for a new jet trainer in the early 1950's to replace the Lockheed T-33, it came as a great surprise to all when Cessna, best known for producing light aircraft, actually won the competition. Little did anyone realise that the T-37, the new training aircraft's designation, would stay in service for fifty years. Along the way the fleet had many rebuilds and is reckoned to have conservatively trained over 500,000 pilots to wings standard. Along the way it garnered many nicknames including 'Tweet, Tweety Bird' and the 'Screaming Dog Whistle'. Had the conflict in Vietnam been avoided this might of been the end of the line for the multi coloured trainer. As America became more involved with the conflict in South East Asia USAF was on a buying spree for all of the latest all singing, all dancing fighter attack aircraft. However, despite their supersonic capability and state of the art avionics these mighty behemoths were not suited to the close air support role. The answer would be to recall some stored early T-37's from the boneyard at Davis-Monthan and in consultation with Cessna turn the 'Tweet' into an attack aircraft. Few high tech gizmo's were needed although the new fighter would sport a minigun in the nose. Pylons were added under the strengthened wings, tip tanks, from the T-37C, were added and engines with a bit more grunt were fitted. The designated unit destined to fly the A-37A 'Dragonfly ' was the 8th Special Operations Squadron. Such was their dedication that a shack on the bombing range was used a measuring point for bombing accuracy. They knew they had succeeded when one pilot blew up the Shack exclaiming the 'SHACK' call over the radio very loudly. The A-37A was soon followed by the 'B' model that was vastly improved and went onto serve globally for many years especially in Latin American countries where a few linger on. This book is written by Kev Darling and is supported with artwork by John Fox.
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Guideline Publications 126 Grumman F-14 Tomcat OUT NOW
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126 Grumman F-14 Tomcat
  £25.00
OUT NOW
Author Charles Stafrace

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Grumman F-14 Tomcat by Charles Stafrace


The US Navy embarked on the VFX fighter programme when it became obvious that the weight, engine and manoeuvrability issues plaguing F-111B, the naval variant of the Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX), would not be resolved to the Navy's satisfaction. The Navy requirement was for a fleet air defence fighter whose primary role was intercepting Soviet bombers before they could launch missiles against the carrier battle group. The Navy strenuously opposed the TFX, which incorporated the US Air Force's requirements for a low-level attack aircraft that were not required by the Navy.
Grumman came up with a solution in the form of their F-14 Tomcat, a supersonic, twin-engine, two-seat, variable-sweep wing aircraft. But what made the Tomcat head and shoulders above all other fighters was its AWG-9 weapons control radar married to the superlative AIM-54A Phoenix air-to-air missile. The Tomcat was all the US Navy required, and the F-111B episode was soon forgotten. The F-14A was the first version of the Tomcat, and it entered US Navy service in 1972 with VF-1 and VF-2 and first deployed overseas on USS Enterprise in 1974, gradually replacing the later versions of the F-4 Phantom on the US carriers' decks.
The F-14A served only with one foreign air force, the Imperial Iranian Air Force which, after the 1978 revolution, came to be known as the Iranian Islamic Iranian Air Force. The Tomcat's role in Iran's war against Iraq from 1980 to 1988 is explained in detail. The Iranian, in its locally-improvised versions, is still in service.
The F-14A version of the Tomcat inherited not only the AWG-9/AIM-54 system from the ill-fated F-111B but also its troublesome TF30 engine. In the US Navy it was only when the F-14B was re-engined with the more powerful and more reliable F-110-GE-400, as was also the F-14D, that the Tomcat really showed its true potential in the air.
The Tomcat went on to serve on all US carriers of the Forrestal and Kitty Hawk Class of carriers and on all nuclear powered carriers built until 2006, the year when the Tomcat was retired from service. During the years it spent on deck, the Tomcat, in its F-14A, F-14B and F-14D versions, participated in all US interventions of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s in the Mediterranean, Middle East and Horn of Africa, and distinguished itself not only as an interceptor fighter, but later also as a ground support and reconnaissance aircraft when the need for these two new roles were needed and when equipped with the LANTIRN and TARPS systems. The Tomcat's story was immortalised by the Hollywood production that made 'Tomcat' and 'Top Gun' household names, but in real life the Tomcat was truly a confirmed 'MiG-killer' and a 'Sukhoi-killer' in encounters with hostile Libyan opposition.
Its exit from the US Navy scene in 2006 was a controversial one, as the aircraft was still considered a valuable asset to the fleet. However, its astronomical maintenance hours per flight hours and its ageing systems compared with the newer F/A-18 Hornet worked against it.
All this is explained in detail in this new Warpaint title, a 124-page account of America's most famous fighter of recent times, that contains no fewer than 280 photos, ten pages of colour profiles, scale plans, fourteen information tables and a text that give exact details of every squadrons, details of all deployments with carrier, CVW, dates and destination, conversions to later versions, and many other information as now expected from titles by author Charles Stafrace, supported by superb artwork by John Fox.
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Guideline Publications Warpaint Special No 4 Cessna Bird Dog
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Warpaint Special No 4 Cessna Bird Dog
  £11.99

Author: Des Brennan
Cessna's Bird Dog was designed and built to serve in what some might regard as the unglamorous field of Army co-operation at a time when attention was more often focused on a growing array of gleaming silver, nuclear-capable jet fighters and bombers deemed essential for a seemingly inevitable Third World War. Nonetheless the Bird Dog was flown sometimes by multiple services and by a wide range of nations on every continent.
The Bird Dog served in numerous internal and cross-border conflicts and was from the 1950s into the 1980s, and with the UH-1 Huey helicopter epitomised the role of the United States air power in operations over South-East Asia during the 1960s and into the 1970s.
This superb 68-page book is written by Des Brennan with superb colour profiles by Mark Roolfe.
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Guideline Publications Spec no 3 De Havilland MOSQUITO Written and Illustrated by Richard J Caruana
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Spec no 3 De Havilland MOSQUITO
  £25.00
Written and Illustrated by Richard J Caruana
Warpaint Special no 3
De Havilland MOSQUITO Available NOW. 84 pages

Born during the dark days of World War 2, the Mosquito was the result of revolutionary thinking that started way back in 1936. Although originally designed and built as a bomber, it was even- tually adapted to any role imaginable where speed was of an essence. In fact its only defence was its capability of outpacing enemy interceptors. A four-cannon and four- gun fighter version was so successful that it was developed into a fighter-bomber that could even carry rockets. It also featured as an unarmed photo-reconnaissance version, as a transport, trainer and target tug. No less than 7,781 Mosquitos were built in Britain, Canada and Australia covering over 40 ver- sions with the last example leaving De Havilland's facility at Chester in November 1950.84 pages
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warpaint special 3 mosquito covers copy-2

warpaint special 3 mosquito p1-80 dragged 2


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Guideline Publications Spec No 2 Messerschmitt Bf 109 Alan W Hall
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Spec No 2 Messerschmitt Bf 109
  £25.00
Alan W Hall
Warpaint Special no 2
Messerschnitt Bf 109 Available NOW. 100 pages

When it comes to famous aircraft of the 20th Century, one that is sure to come to the top of the list is the Messerschmitt Bf109. With a career spanning nearly 20 years and over 30.000 examples of being built the Bf109 is probably the most recognised of all the World War 2 fighters. Ironically this German fighter started and ended its life being powered by British engines.
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